The Lord of the Rings: 60th Anniversary Edition
A sumptuous new one-volume edition of Tolkien’s classic masterpiece that is fully illustrated throughout in watercolour by the acclaimed and award-winning artist, Alan Lee, and housed in a special transparent slipcase. 
If I didn’t already have the 50th anniversary edition, I’d get this. 

The Lord of the Rings: 60th Anniversary Edition

A sumptuous new one-volume edition of Tolkien’s classic masterpiece that is fully illustrated throughout in watercolour by the acclaimed and award-winning artist, Alan Lee, and housed in a special transparent slipcase. 

If I didn’t already have the 50th anniversary edition, I’d get this. 

"The men of the Geats were sitting on a bench together; Beowulf himself was in an honourable place (as we learn in his report to Hygelac) beside Hrothgar’s young son: thus not far from the king himself, and near to Unferth, who sat at the king’s feet. Unferth’s outburst is thus not bellowed at Beowulf from a distance — a savage discourtesy which would not have been tolerated by Hrothgar. He spoke clearly, with malice, but not at first outward discourtesy, certainly not with violence. (His chief object was the ears of the king and the chief people nearby.) Correctly read, his words should begin in an outwardly polite tone, so that they might be taken at first by hearers to be courteous, even admiring. In more or less modern terms: ‘Are you the great Beowulf, the one who had that famous swimming match with Breca?’ Since clearly Breca (historical or not does not here matter) was a famous character in tales of swimming and sea-hunting, this would sound complimentary enough, and men near would prick up their ears. Note then with what art the tone is shifted. It was a mad prank. Then comes the lie (as it is meant to be taken): ‘Breca beat you, he was the stronger’. This would be said in a matter of fact tone — befitting one who just reports facts (which it was the function of a þyle to know and remember). Breca’s position as an independent chieftain is added to make the lie more convincing. Only at the end does Unferth’s tone become more malicious and menacing or contemptuous. But at no point does he shout or bluster.

On the other hand, Beowulf shows resentment at once. He begins with an accusation that Unferth has drunk too much. He continues in a louder and more combative tone and style than Unferth had yet used, by giving his own account. Read aloud, it is almost impossible not to feel and not to represent the rising passion of Beowulf, as he recalls the events. And then being now fully heated with wrath, he turns on Unferth personally. Each sentence rises to a new point of scorn and anger, until at last forgetful of all courtesy he speaks in contempt of Danish courage, and vows to oppose Grendel with Geatish valour.

The ‘flyting’ is a memorable passage, very good even by modern standards, though we may tend to criticize it: for instance, in the somewhat repetitive references to the swimming in the sea. Yet it must be remember that though ‘dramatic’ this is not drama, but narrative poetry (or mouth-filling rhetoric). In the economy of the tale it has, of course, a narrative function: Unferth touches off the spark of Beowulf’s passionate (but not savage!) nature, and brings him to the point of a public vow to challenge Grendel at once. From that he cannot recede. More, we now really meet and know Beowulf and his character. Steadfast, loyal, chivalrous (according to the sentiment of the author’s time), but with a smouldering fire. He is on the good side: his enemies are wild beasts, monstrous and evil creatures, or his king’s and people’s foes. But when roused he is capable of violent and superhuman action. If he does not wholly follow the sober counsels of wisdom, he satisfies their most important prescription. He speaks gilp (proud vows) in the heat of his heart but he performs his vow — even to his last day, when it cost him his life."
J.R.R. Tolkien, Beowulf: A Translation and Commentary, “Commentary”, pp. 211-13

This is one of my favorite passages from the Commentary so far — very unexpected, since I’ve usually skimmed over this part of the story almost every other time I’ve read the poem. While the translation is not terribly fun to read (more accurate and scholarly than an aesthetically pleasing work of art), the Commentary alone is worth the price of the book. I’ve read in a couple places before of how Tolkien’s students always admired him for his lectures, particularly the ones on Beowulf, and it is from the text of these very lectures that the Commentary is taken. Reading his views on the nature of the poem, its historical and cultural roots, his analysis on the meaning of difficult passages and words, and his discussion of the blending of history, legend, and fairy tale elements, I feel like I’m sitting in a room in Oxford, listening to the Professor teach. It’s a true pleasure. 
famousfirstsentence:

"In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit."

famousfirstsentence:

"In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit."

"Deserves it! I daresay he does. Many that live deserve death. And some that die deserve life. Can you give it to them? Then do not be too eager to deal out death in judgement. For even the very wise cannot see all ends."
J.R.R. TolkienThe Fellowship of the Ring 

andrewstuntpilot:

A beautiful bargain find hidden at the bottom of a shelf. This one’s been on my to-read list for quite a while and I’m so glad that I found a lovely edition to drift off into soon.

Wow, this is a beautiful edition! I’ve never seen this one before. 

hmhbooks:

It’s here! Tolkien’s translation of BEOWULF, a project nearly a century in the making, is finally in the world today:

The translation of BEOWULF by J.R.R. Tolkien was an early work, very distinctive in its mode, completed in 1926: he returned to it later to make hasty corrections, but seems never to have considered its publication. This edition is twofold, for there exists an illuminating commentary on the text of the poem by the translator himself, in the written form of a series of lectures given at Oxford in the 1930s; and from these lectures a substantial selection has been made, to form also a commentary on the translation in this book. 

Buy it here (or get some fresh air and head to your local bookstore in person!). 

hmhbooks:

It’s here! Tolkien’s translation of BEOWULF, a project nearly a century in the making, is finally in the world today:

The translation of BEOWULF by J.R.R. Tolkien was an early work, very distinctive in its mode, completed in 1926: he returned to it later to make hasty corrections, but seems never to have considered its publication. This edition is twofold, for there exists an illuminating commentary on the text of the poem by the translator himself, in the written form of a series of lectures given at Oxford in the 1930s; and from these lectures a substantial selection has been made, to form also a commentary on the translation in this book. 

Buy it here (or get some fresh air and head to your local bookstore in person!). 

The Lord of the Rings - 50th Anniversary Edition (by Christoffer Thörnqvist)

The Lord of the Rings - 50th Anniversary Edition (by Christoffer Thörnqvist)

renaissance329:

riddles in the dark

renaissance329:

riddles in the dark

ordinarypeopleadorable:

The Return of the King by J.R.R. Tolkien, Unwin Paperbacks edition, 1979

ordinarypeopleadorable:

The Return of the King by J.R.R. Tolkien, Unwin Paperbacks edition, 1979

adenydd:

this is the ukrainian edition of the silmarillion, and it is a thing of beauty. (design by yuri krukevych and vladimir stasenko, 2008).

adenydd:

this is the ukrainian edition of the silmarillion, and it is a thing of beauty. (design by yuri krukevych and vladimir stasenko, 2008).

fro-do:

Source

"The Lord of The Rings" Cover Porn.

Still, I wonder if we shall ever be put into songs or tales. We’re in one, of course; but I mean: put into words, you know, told by the fireside, or read out loud of a great big book with red and black letters, years and years afterwards. And people will say: ‘Let’s hear about Frodo and the Ring’ and they’ll say ‘Oh yes, that’s one of my favorite stories.

J. R. R. Tolkien