Frodo and Frodo…Elijah Woods as Frodo Baggins, with his scale double Kiran Shah.

Frodo and Frodo…

Elijah Woods as Frodo Baggins, with his scale double Kiran Shah.

guttergoose:

Obligatory Bakshi Lord of the Rings gif
He is freaking the flip out

guttergoose:

Obligatory Bakshi Lord of the Rings gif

He is freaking the flip out

benjaminschipper:

Final piece in the #tolkien series, hope you’ve enjoyed them! #benjaminschipperillustration (at 23 Balsam)

I assume this is supposed to be Tolkien and Frodo? 

benjaminschipper:

Final piece in the #tolkien series, hope you’ve enjoyed them! #benjaminschipperillustration (at 23 Balsam)

I assume this is supposed to be Tolkien and Frodo? 

Mount Doom; art by Jian Guo

Mount Doom; art by Jian Guo

The Farthest Away From Home; art by Caroline Hadilaksono

The Farthest Away From Home; art by Caroline Hadilaksono

A Long Journey; art by Mika Madden

A Long Journey; art by Mika Madden

guttergoose:

Oh my god, be strong, Frodo!

Ralph Bakshi. You can say what you want about his animation, but the screenplay was unquestionably more faithful to the book. 

guttergoose:

Oh my god, be strong, Frodo!

Ralph Bakshi. You can say what you want about his animation, but the screenplay was unquestionably more faithful to the book. 

elrondsdaughter:

Atop Cerin Amroth by Anke Eissmann


Cerin Amroth was a mound in the heart of the ancient land of Lothlórien on which grew two rings of trees and a great tree with a white flet.The hill was originally piled after the first millennium of the Third Age to be used as an outlook post for the growing shadow of Dol Guldur. Amroth, the king of Lórien, later built a house on the flet to use as a home and the hill became named after him. However his house was not present centuries later, and the hill was covered with elanor and niphredil.

elrondsdaughter:

Atop Cerin Amroth by Anke Eissmann

Cerin Amroth was a mound in the heart of the ancient land of Lothlórien on which grew two rings of trees and a great tree with a white flet.

The hill was originally piled after the first millennium of the Third Age to be used as an outlook post for the growing shadow of Dol Guldur. Amroth, the king of Lórien, later built a house on the flet to use as a home and the hill became named after him. However his house was not present centuries later, and the hill was covered with elanor and niphredil.

Gandalf moved his chair to the bedside, and took a good look at Frodo. The colour had come back to his face, and his eyes were clear, and fully awake and aware. He was smiling, and there seemed to be little wrong with him. But to the wizard’s eye there was a faint change just a hint as it were of transparency, about him, and especially about the left hand that lay outside upon the coverlet. 
`Still that must be expected,’ said Gandalf to himself. `He is not half through yet, and to what he will come in the end not even Elrond can foretell. Not to evil, I think. He may become like a glass filled with a clear light for eyes to see that can.’

J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring, “Many Meetings”

Gandalf moved his chair to the bedside, and took a good look at Frodo. The colour had come back to his face, and his eyes were clear, and fully awake and aware. He was smiling, and there seemed to be little wrong with him. But to the wizard’s eye there was a faint change just a hint as it were of transparency, about him, and especially about the left hand that lay outside upon the coverlet. 

`Still that must be expected,’ said Gandalf to himself. `He is not half through yet, and to what he will come in the end not even Elrond can foretell. Not to evil, I think. He may become like a glass filled with a clear light for eyes to see that can.’

J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring, “Many Meetings”

They’re going to the harbour beyond the White Towers. The Grey Havens. They’re leaving Middle Earth. Never to return.

It’s things like this that make me say that the LoTR film trilogy captures the spirit of the books better than the Hobbit films thusfar have, even though the latter is truer to the story of its original more than the former. 

Apparitions; art by Ted Nasmith

Frodo seemed the most weary of the three, and slow though they went, he often lagged. The hobbits soon found that what had looked like one vast fen was really an endless network of pools, and soft mires, and winding half-strangled water-courses. Among these a cunning eye and foot could thread a wandering path. Gollum certainly had that cunning, and needed all of it. His head on its long neck was ever turning this way and that, while he sniffed and muttered all the time to himself. Sometimes he would hold up his hand and halt them, while he went forward a little, crouching, testing the ground with fingers or toes, or merely listening with one ear pressed to the earth….
Presently it grew altogether dark: the air itself seemed black and heavy to breathe. When lights appeared Sam rubbed his eyes: he thought his head was going queer. He first saw one with the corner of his left eye, a wisp of pale sheen that faded away; but others appeared soon after: some like dimly shining smoke, some like misty flames flickering slowly above unseen candles; here and there they twisted like ghostly sheets unfurled by hidden hands. But neither of his companions spoke a word.
At last Sam could bear it no longer. ‘What’s all this, Gollum?’ he said in a whisper. ‘These lights? They’re all round us now. Are we trapped? Who are they?’
Gollum looked up. A dark water was before him, and he was crawling on the ground, this way and that, doubtful of the way. ‘Yes, they are all round us,’ he whispered. ‘The tricksy lights. Candles of corpses, yes, yes. Don’t you heed them! Don’t look! Don’t follow them! Where’s the master?’

— J.R.R. Tolkien, The Two Towers, “The Passage of the Marshes”

Apparitions; art by Ted Nasmith

Frodo seemed the most weary of the three, and slow though they went, he often lagged. The hobbits soon found that what had looked like one vast fen was really an endless network of pools, and soft mires, and winding half-strangled water-courses. Among these a cunning eye and foot could thread a wandering path. Gollum certainly had that cunning, and needed all of it. His head on its long neck was ever turning this way and that, while he sniffed and muttered all the time to himself. Sometimes he would hold up his hand and halt them, while he went forward a little, crouching, testing the ground with fingers or toes, or merely listening with one ear pressed to the earth….

Presently it grew altogether dark: the air itself seemed black and heavy to breathe. When lights appeared Sam rubbed his eyes: he thought his head was going queer. He first saw one with the corner of his left eye, a wisp of pale sheen that faded away; but others appeared soon after: some like dimly shining smoke, some like misty flames flickering slowly above unseen candles; here and there they twisted like ghostly sheets unfurled by hidden hands. But neither of his companions spoke a word.

At last Sam could bear it no longer. ‘What’s all this, Gollum?’ he said in a whisper. ‘These lights? They’re all round us now. Are we trapped? Who are they?’

Gollum looked up. A dark water was before him, and he was crawling on the ground, this way and that, doubtful of the way. ‘Yes, they are all round us,’ he whispered. ‘The tricksy lights. Candles of corpses, yes, yes. Don’t you heed them! Don’t look! Don’t follow them! Where’s the master?’

— J.R.R. Tolkien, The Two Towers, “The Passage of the Marshes”

"As for Frodo or other mortals, they could only dwell in Aman for a limited time — whether brief or long. The Valar had neither the power nor the right to confer ‘immortality’ upon them. Their sojourn was a ‘purgatory’, but one of peace and healing and they would eventually pass away (die at their own desire and of free will) to destinations of which the Elves knew nothing."
J.R.R. Tolkien, Letters, #325
"Frodo in the tale actually takes the Ring and claims it, and certainly he too would have had a clear vision — but he was not given any time: he was immediately attacked by Gollum. When Sauron was aware of the seizure of the Ring his one hope was in its power: that the claimant would be unable to relinquish it until Sauron had time to deal with him. Frodo too would then probably, if not attacked, have had to take the same way: cast himself with the Ring into the abyss. If not he would of course have completely failed. It is an interesting problem: how Sauron would have acted or the claimant have resisted. Sauron sent at once the Ringwraiths. They were naturally fully instructed, and in no way deceived as to the real lordship of the Ring. The wearer would not be invisible to them, but the reverse; and the more vulnerable to their weapons. But the situation was now different to that under Weathertop, where Frodo acted merely in fear and wished only to use (in vain) the Ring’s subsidiary power of conferring invisibility. He had grown since then. Would they have been immune from its power if he claimed it as an instrument of command and domination?

Not wholly. I do not think they could have attacked him with violence, nor laid hold upon him or taken him captive; they would have obeyed or feigned to obey any minor commands of his that did not interfere with their errand — laid upon them by Sauron, who still through their nine rings (which he held) had primary control of their wills. That errand was to remove Frodo from the Crack. Once he lost the power or opportunity to destroy the Ring, the end could not be in doubt — saving help from outside, which was hardly even remotely possible.

Frodo had become a considerable person, but of a special kind: in spiritual enlargement rather than in increase of physical or mental power; his will was much stronger than it had been, but so far it had been exercised in resisting not using the Ring and with the object of destroying it. He needed time, much time, before he could control the Ring or (which in such a case is the same) before it could control him; before his will and arrogance could grow to a stature in which he could dominate other major hostile wills. Even so for a long time his acts and commands would still have to seem ‘good’ to him, to be for the benefit of others beside himself.

The situation as between Frodo with the Ring and the Eight* might be compared to that of a small brave man armed with a devastating weapon, faced by eight savage warriors of great strength and agility armed with poisoned blades. The man’s weakness was that he did not know how to use his weapon yet; and he was by temperament and training averse to violence. Their weakness that the man’s weapon was a thing that filled them with fear as an object of terror in their religious cult, by which they had been conditioned to treat one who wielded it with servility. I think they would have shown ‘servility’. They would have greeted Frodo as ‘Lord’. With fair speeches they would have induced him to leave the Sammath Naur – for instance ‘to look upon his new kingdom, and behold afar with his new sight the abode of power that he must now claim and turn to his own purposes’. Once outside the chamber while he was gazing some of them would have destroyed the entrance. Frodo would by then probably have been already too enmeshed in great plans of reformed rule — like but far greater and wider than the vision that tempted Sam (III 177)5 — to heed this. But if he still preserved some sanity and partly understood the significance of it, so that he refused now to go with them to Barad-dûr, they would simply have waited. Until Sauron himself came. In any case a confrontation of Frodo and Sauron would soon have taken place, if the Ring was intact. Its result was inevitable. Frodo would have been utterly overthrown: crushed to dust, or preserved in torment as a gibbering slave.

* The Witch-king had been reduced to impotence.

5 ‘Wild fantasies arose in his mind; and he saw Samwise the Strong, Hero of the Age, striding with a sword across the darkened land, and armies flocking to his call as he marched to the overthrow of Barad-dûr.’
"
J.R.R. Tolkien, Letters, #246